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November 26, 2014

Holidays start in August for some small businesses

Filed under: Uncategorized, technology — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 1:36 pm

NEW YORK (AP) — Chris Mann learned it’s better to hire help for the November and December holidays while people in many parts of the U.S. are still wearing shorts and tank tops.

Mann used to wait until the holidays were at hand before hiring. But the brand-new workers peppered managers with questions about products and procedures at his two Woodhouse Day Spas in the Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio, areas — just as the managers were trying to help an influx of extra customers.

“It’s nearly impossible to train in the busiest time of the year,” says Mann, whose spas offer services like massages, facials, manicures and pedicures. Now he hires in August. By mid-November, the holiday staffers are up to speed and the spas run efficiently, he says.

Seasonal hiring isn’t as temporary as it used to be for some small businesses. Hiring extra help takes time. And then there’s the extra training and supervision. Thin staffing at many small businesses makes the process of assimilating seasonal workers harder than at larger companies. It all adds up to owners taking on holiday season employees as early as summer — or making other advance preparations to get ready for the influx of business near the end of the year.

SEEKING THE RIGHT FIT

David Bolotsky starts hiring in August to be sure he gets seasonal staffers who have a good attitude, work well with others and are willing to commit to a job not likely to lead to year-round employment.

The owner of Uncommon Goods, an online retailer of clothing and home goods, brings in recruiters to screen prospective staffers and try to weed out ones who look like they won’t be a good fit. Finding staffers is complicated by the location of his business. Uncommon Goods is based in the New York City borough of Brooklyn and some potentially good staffers would rather work in Manhattan. That makes for a smaller pool of candidates and a longer search process.

“It’s a mountain to climb and it’s a huge mountain every year,” Bolotsky says.

BIG-TIME PLANNING

Some small businesses take on so many seasonal staffers they transform into large companies for a short time. That requires well-organized hiring and training systems.

Vermont Teddy Bear Co., which sells stuffed, toy bears that wear outfits for holidays, graduations and other occasions, has about 135 year-round staffers. This year the Shelburne, Vermont, company expects 1,000 temporary workers to take telephone orders, pack boxes and work in the retail store at its factory, CEO Bill Shouldice says. That’s up from 850 last year. Like other smaller companies, Vermont Teddy Bear begins its seasonal hiring in late summer.

The company also gives year-round staffers short-term promotions so they’re able to supervise the influx of seasonal workers. And it hires human resources people temporarily to screen prospective employees and make sure they’re right for the job.

“You don’t want to hire a bunch of people who don’t show up, who didn’t really understand they’re going to be talking to customers or using computers or packing boxes,” Shouldice says.

TOO SOON TO TELL

But not every company can hire months in advance. Some owners have to wait until the last minute because they can’t predict staffing needs that early. Mohu, a manufacturer of high-definition TV antennas, usually has a surge in orders around the holidays when people buy new TVs. Last year, CEO Mark Buff had to double his staff to 50 from 25 to manufacture, pack and ship the antennas, but the hiring spurt didn’t happen until early December.

“We don’t know yet about this year,” says Buff, whose company is located in Raleigh, North Carolina. “It really depends on the orders.”

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Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg

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November 21, 2014

Linden MacIntyre on community, vengeance and punishment

Filed under: canada, management — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 6:00 pm

Linden MacIntyre is not going quietly into retirement.

He was in the headlines this week over comments comparing CBC news anchor Peter Mansbridge with former colleague Jian Ghomeshi. His last piece for the CBC’s fifth estate aired on Friday and his fourth novel, Punishment, has just published.

Both deal with justice, and with how communities band together to reinforce shared values and shared mythologies. In the case of the fifth estate piece: how an innocent man spent three years behind bars after police pressured witnesses to change their stories. In Punishment, a community holds tight to old assumptions about a former convict in a bid to make their town seem a safer place.

At 71 years old, and with a journalism career that spans 50 years — including 38 at the CBC, the past 24 co-hosting the investigative magazine show — old habits appear to be dying hard for MacIntyre. He’s reminiscing in his publisher’s office about his most memorable investigations

“The Trouble with Evan,” he recounts with some passion, “was a monumental piece of television.” The award-winning investigation, which ran as a special two-hour segment of thefifth estate on the CBC in 1994, focused on the psychological abuse heaped on a boy by his parents, who found him “difficult.”

“We had thousands of reactions to it,” says MacIntyre, including one 27-year-old inmate who wrote and said “somebody has got to help that kid or he is going to end up like me.”

That inmate became part of the inspiration for Punishment. The narrative centres on two men: a former inmate, Dwayne Strickland, and prison guard Tony Breau. The two have much in common. Both were adopted into families in a small Nova Scotia town, St. Ninian. Both ended up in prison, albeit on different sides of the bars.

And both returned to the small town of their youth, each in their own ways becoming part of the “mythology” of the community. As MacIntyre points out, the ties and values that bind a community are often based on myth. Things such as: a small town is safe, you never quite know how adopted kids are going to end up, once a criminal always a criminal.

To make his point, MacIntyre refers back to another real-life story, that of murdered schoolgirl Christine Jessop: “That family moved from Toronto to Queensville, Ontario, because of the mythology that places like Queensville are safer than Toronto. Which is horse manure. Wherever there are people there is danger. Wherever there are people there is comfort and safety. But there is no place that’s safer than another place unless there is nobody else living there.”

It’s a rather bleak view of the human state.

MacIntyre himself grew up in a small, isolated town “where there were very few people my own age,” he says. To keep himself amused “I read a lot of fiction . . . at an early age I developed a fascination with the business of writing. I always thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be remarkable to be one of those people who could write a book?’ . . . You create people, you create worlds, you create reality around you. And it never crossed my mind that I could be one of those people because those people came from bigger, more sophisticated places.”

He’s created just that in Punishment, although his characters come back to the simple small town from bigger, more sophisticated places. They’ve already had the big experiences and they’re coming back home, back to where it’s safe.

This allows MacIntrye to explore what safety means and to look at ideas of why we, as individuals and as a society, seek justice, vengeance, punishment, scapegoating.

That need is explored in Punishment when the ex-con Strickland moves back to the community. So does Breau, who takes early retirement from his prison job, and Neil Archie MacDonald, who retires in disgrace from his own police career in Boston. Caddy Stewart, whose granddaughter is found dead at Strickland’s house, provides a catalyst for these issues to collide within the narrative free online credit report.

MacIntyre hearkens back to his childhood again, to a man with parallels to Strickland. His name was Johnny Macfarlane and he was “permanently presumed to be guilty.” His family was big and the children “right out of Dickens” with runny noses, rotten teeth and grinding poverty.

Johnny served a lot of “useful functions,” says MacIntyre, a touch sardonically. “He excused us from looking at ourselves. He excused us from looking at the health of the community . . . if you were hostile to Johnny you could be hostile to his whole pathetic family, and so there was never any sense of what could we do to improve that family and maybe make the place a little safer.”

MacIntyre is a masterful storyteller, in person telling about how his own father spoke Gaelic until he was 9 years old while his grandparents never learned to speak much English. “The interesting thing was my father was about a fourth generation Canadian, but they lived in such isolation that they never really had to use English.” His father worked as a hard rock miner, something MacIntyre himself worked at during the summers, earning money to pay for university.

That talent for storytelling has served MacIntyre well.

He’s won 10 Gemini Awards for his work as well as the 2010 Giller Prize for Canadian fiction for his novel The Bishop’s Man. That book was part of a trilogy that began with 1999’s The Long Stretch and included 2012’s Why Men Lie. He’s also written an award-winning memoir, Causeway: A Passage from Innocence about the building of a causeway between Cape Breton, where he grew up, and mainland Nova Scotia in the 1950s.

It’s a long way in some ways from the setting of Punishment, taking place as it does with the backdrop of Sept. 11 and the hunt for Saddam Hussein and his alleged weapons of mass destruction. But in a way it makes perfect sense. The small community becomes a microcosm of the bigger world, provides a contained place, a structure in which to explore how we treat each other.

And to understand how communities deal with disaster; why it is that, when something bad happens “there’s an instant need for understanding and an explanation of why it happened. But also, and overwhelmingly, reassurance that nobody in the family is to blame. Nobody in the community is to blame.”

A real-life example comes up as an attempt at explanation, MacIntrye referring back to another of his experiences, this time when he was covering the conflict in the Middle East.

“I remember talking to these brilliant young Israeli soldiers, very Europeanized, educated, doing their time in the army,” he says. They had been at an “awful massacre,” which MacIntrye says they could have stopped, could have prevented. “Instead they enabled it. I said, ‘How do you justify that? In there, there’s nothing but dead children and old people and you guys stood by and let it happen.’ And this guy . . . a guy you could probably sit down and talk literature or music or whatever with, a very sophisticated person, says, ‘They’re all terrorists. They’re all terrorists.’ You kill a kid, you are killing tomorrow’s terrorist. You kill a woman, you kill the incubator for tomorrow’s terrorist.”

It’s a messy business, life. And perhaps the best we can do is understand. After 50 or so years of journalism, of covering conflict, of seeing people at their worst, MacIntyre has this to say:

“People do bad things for very complicated reasons and it’s incumbent on us to find out what those reasons are so that we can then begin to correct the causes that produced the problem.

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November 8, 2014

U.S. airstrike destroys convoy carrying Islamic State leaders

Filed under: loans, term — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 7:56 pm

BAGHDAD—The U.S. has conducted a series of airstrikes targeting Islamic State leaders near the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, U.S. military officials said Saturday.

The airstrikes on Friday night destroyed a convoy of 10 armed trucks believed to be carrying some Islamic State (IS) leaders, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity to describe military operations.

The officials could not confirm whether the top Islamic State leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was among those targeted. Al-Baghdadi has declared himself the caliph, or supreme leader, of the vast areas of territory in Iraq and Syria under IS control.

Despite the airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition, Sunni militants have continued to carrying out deadly bombings targeting Iraqi security forces and civilians. A suicide truck bomber struck the convoy of a top Iraqi police officer killing eight people, including the ranking official, authorities said Saturday, in an attack that bore the hallmarks of militants from the Islamic State group.

The late Friday attack happened when the suicide attacker drove his bomb-laden truck into the convoy of police Lt.-Gen. Faisal Malik al-Zamel, who was inspecting forces in the town of Beiji north of Baghdad, police said. The blast killed al-Zamel and seven other police officers, while wounding 15 people, hospital officials and police officers said.

Meanwhile on Saturday, a series of bombings in and around the capital Baghdad killed at least 43 people, with the deadliest blast hitting the city’s sprawling Shiite district of Sadr City, where a car bomb tore through a commercial area, killing 11 people and wounding 21.

There has been an uptick in the number of bombings blamed on Sunni militants in the capital and mostly targeting Shiites, feeding sectarian tensions in the city, as the security forces of the Shiite-led government battle the Sunni militants of the Islamic State group to the west and north of the capital. More recently, the attacks targeted Shiite pilgrims marking Ashoura, the highlight of the sect’s religious calendar.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack in Beiji, 250 kilometres north of Baghdad, but suicide bombings have been the signature style of Sunni militants for more than a decade in Iraq.

Shiite Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, recognizing al-Zamel’s standing, led mourners at al-Zamel’s funeral on Saturday and a top army officer, Gen. Abdul-Wahab al-Saadi, vowed to avenge his death.

“Beiji will be the graveyard of Daesh (the Arabic acronym for the IS group),” said a clearly moved al-Saadi on state television payday loan lenders.

Al-Saadi and al-Zamel have been leading the ongoing battle to rid Beiji, which is located in Salahuddin, of IS fighters who swept into the city last summer. “We have cleansed many of Beiji’s neighbourhoods and we will shortly announce its complete liberation,” said al-Saadi.

A U.S.-led coalition has been launching airstrikes on Islamic State militants and facilities in Iraq and Syria for months, as part of an effort to give Iraqi forces the time and space to mount a more effective offensive. The IS had gained ground across northern and western Iraq in a lightning advance in June and July, causing several of Iraq’s army and police divisions to fall into disarray.

On Friday, U.S. President Barack Obama authorized the deployment of up to 1,500 more American troops to bolster Iraqi forces, including into Anbar province, where fighting with IS militants has been fierce. The plan could boost the total number of American troops in Iraq to 3,100. There now are about 1,400 U.S. troops in Iraq, out of the 1,600 previously authorized.

“What is needed from the U.S. is that it should work to bring the Iraqi people together,” said Hamid al-Mutlaq, a Sunni Iraqi lawmaker. “America, and others, should not become an obstacle that hinder the Iraqis’ ambitions for a free Iraqi decision that serves the interests of Iraq”

Besides the Sadr City bombing, at least nine people were killed and another 18 wounded when a car bomb tore through the commercial neighbourhood of Al-Amin in southeastern Baghdad. Two car bombs also killed eight people and wounded 16 on a commercial street in Baghdad’s southwestern Amil neighbourhood, police officials said.

A car bomb also detonated on a commercial street in Baghdad’s busy central al-Karadah district, killing seven people and wounding at least 21, officials said. In Yousifiya, a town just south of the capital, two people were killed and four wounded in a bombing near a fruit and vegetable market. Another car bomb struck Zafaraniya in southeastern Baghdad, killing six and wounding 13, officials said.

Hospital officials confirmed the casualties. All police and hospital officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to journalists.

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November 6, 2014

A-B adding ‘Oculto’ tequila flavored beer

Filed under: Uncategorized, legal — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 11:56 pm

In a bid to attract Millennials, Anheuser-Busch will launch a tequila flavored beer next year called Oculto that’s aged on Mexican tequila barrel staves. 

St. Louis-based A-B, the U.S. subsidiary of A-B InBev, said Oculto will make its U.S. debut in Spring 2015. More information about a launch date, marketing campaign and packaging will be announced early next year, a spokesperson said.

Oculto, which means “hidden” or “waiting to be found” in Spanish has 6 percent alcohol by volume (ABV). The lager infuses beer aged on Mexican tequila barrels with blue agave. 

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November 3, 2014

Python missing in southern Ontario town

Filed under: Uncategorized, business — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 7:16 pm

LAKESHORE, ONT.—A one-metre-long python is missing in the southwestern Ontario town of Lakeshore but police say the snake is not dangerous.

Provincial police say the python’s owner was in the process of moving it Sunday afternoon in the town southeast of Windsor when it slithered away.

Despite an extensive search, the owner was unable to find the missing snake payday loan.

Police say people should known that the python is non-venomous and is not known to be aggressive towards humans.

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October 31, 2014

Gas falling under $3 nationwide: What to know

Filed under: management, online — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 1:20 pm

NEW YORK (AP) — The sight is so surprising that Americans are sharing photos of it, along with all those cute Halloween costumes, sweeping vistas and special meals: The gas station sign, with a price under $3 a gallon.

“It’s stunning what’s happening here,” says Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service. “I’m a little bit shocked.”

The national average price of gasoline has fallen 33 cents in October, landing Friday at $3.00, according to AAA. Kloza said the average will fall under $3 by early Saturday morning for the first time in four years.

When the national average crossed above $3 a gallon in December of 2010, drivers weren’t sure they’d ever see $2.99 again. Global demand for oil and gasoline was rising as people in developing countries bought cars by the tens of millions and turmoil was brewing in the oil-rich Middle East.

Now demand isn’t rising as fast as expected, drillers have learned to tap vast new sources of oil, particularly in the U.S., and crude continues to flow out of the Middle East.

Seasonal swings and other factors will likely send gas back over $3 sooner than drivers would like, but the U.S. is on track for the lowest annual average since 2010 — and the 2015 average is expected to be lower even still.

Trisha Pena of Hermitage, Tennessee, recently paid $2.57 a gallon to fill up her Honda CRV. Like many around the country these days, she was so surprised and delighted by the price she took a photo and posted it on social media for her friends to see. “I can’t remember the last time it cost under $30 to put 10 or 11 gallons in my tank,” she said in an interview. “A month ago it was in the $3.50 range, and that’s where it had been for a very long time.”

Here are a few things to know about cheap gas:

— Crude prices came off the boil. Oil fell from $107 a barrel in June to near $81 because there’s a lot of supply and weak demand. U.S. output has increased 70 percent since 2008, and supplies from Iraq and Canada have also increased. At the same time, demand is weaker than expected because of a sluggish global economy fast cash advance loan.

— In the past, a stronger economy in the U.S., the world’s biggest consumer of oil and gasoline, typically meant rising fuel demand. No longer. Americans are driving more efficient vehicles and our driving habits are changing. Michael Sivak of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute calculates that the number of miles travelled per household and gallons of fuel consumed per household peaked in 2004.

— The drop from last year’s average of $3.51 per gallon will save the typical U.S. household about $50 a month.

— The drop will save the U.S. economy $187 million a day, and also boost the profits of shippers, airlines, and any company that sends employees out on sales calls or for deliveries.

— It will take an extra 1.5 years to make purchasing a higher-priced, better-mileage Toyota Prius instead of a Toyota Corolla pay off.

— New York’s average of $3.37 is the highest in the continental U.S. South Carolina and Tennessee are the lowest, with an average of $2.75.

— Politicians are either going to take the credit for lower gasoline prices or blame the other party for not helping them fall further. Don’t listen. There are small things politicians can do over long time horizons, like implement fuel economy standards or ease drilling regulations, but the decline in prices is mainly due to market forces.

— Gasoline is cheaper than milk again. In September the national average price of milk was $3.73 per gallon. The annual average for milk is on track to be more expensive than the annual average for gasoline for the first time since 2011. The gap is even bigger for some bottled water lovers. A case of a dozen 1.5 liter bottles of Evian on Amazon.com costs $38.99, which makes for a price per gallon of $8.20.

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October 25, 2014

Man killed after attacking rookie cops with hatchet

Filed under: Uncategorized, online ads — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 1:36 am

NEW YORK—A hatchet-wielding man who charged at four rookie New York City police officers Thursday as they posed for a photograph on a Queens street was shot and killed after he struck one of the officers in the head and another in the arm, William J. Bratton, the police commissioner, said.

Stray police bullets also struck a 29-year-old woman in the lower back as she walked in the rain about half a block away along a normally crowded commercial stretch of Jamaica Avenue just after 2 p.m.

The man, who was not immediately identified by the police and whose motive for the attack remained unclear, died at the scene. The police recovered a blue-handled, 18-inch hatchet, and Bratton displayed a photograph of the weapon at a news conference at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center on Thursday evening.

“At this point, no known motive for this attack has been established,” Bratton said.

Kenneth Healey, a 25-year-old recent graduate of the Police Academy, was in critical but stable condition after suffering a “very serious injury to the back side of his head,” Bratton said. The officer struck in the arm, Joseph Meeker, 24, was expected to be released.

The bystander who was struck during the chaotic scene was in stable condition after surgery, also at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, he said.

The burst of violence occurred on the sidewalk in front of a department store where the four uniformed officers were standing on a regularly assigned foot patrol Payday Loan for Bad Credit. A passer-by asked to photograph the officers, Bratton said, and they obliged.

As they did so, standing together, a man in a hooded green rain jacket approached quickly from down the block, pulled a hatchet from his clothes, raised it over his head and, appearing to say nothing, brought it down on the officers with two hands, video released by the police showed.

The man first hit one officer in the arm and, continuing to swing, hit another in the head, Bratton said. A witness to the attack said that blow appeared to be particularly severe. “His head was split open from here to here,” said the witness, Mick Jones, 52, tracing a finger from his forehead to the back of his head. “His hat probably saved his life.”

The two other officers drew their weapons and fired multiple times at the man, killing him, Bratton said.

Standing beside the police commissioner, Mayor Bill de Blasio described the actions of the young officers as “bravery in the face of something absolutely unexpected.” He added, “They responded exactly as their training dictated.”

Bratton said the photographer and the attacker appeared to have no connection. The photographer, he added, has been cooperating with detectives to piece together what occurred, including providing the police with the photos he had taken.

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October 17, 2014

Renzi Plan to Shake Up Labor Market Seen Helping Italy Recovery - Bloomberg

Filed under: loans, news — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 2:44 am

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi

October 10, 2014

German downturn casts shadow over world economy

Filed under: canada, term — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 1:44 pm

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — As if the global economy didn’t have enough troubles, it looks like Germany, Europe’s traditional growth engine, risks falling into recession — or growth so weak it holds back the entire euro currency union’s weak recovery.

Europe’s largest economy has seen a run of lousy numbers for factory orders, industrial production, exports and business confidence. All that’s bad news because exporting industrial goods such as machines and cars is the heart of Germany’s globally linked economy.

And if Germany isn’t selling goods, it suggests other parts of the world’s economy are not strong enough to keep buying them.

Global stock markets tumbled this week, in part due to the German figures, with the U.S. logging its worst day of the year on Thursday. Germany’s DAX blue chip index was down a painful 2 percent on Friday.

But are things in Germany all that bad? Economists are debating whether it’s really time to use the R-word and predict a shallow recession. That would be another quarter of negative output in the third quarter, which ended Sept. 30, following shrinkage of 0.2 percent in the second quarter.

Here are the key issues.

AS GERMANY GOES: So does Europe, in many ways. Strong business activity in Germany has made the overall growth figure for the 18 countries that use the euro look a lot better in the past few years. And Europe showed zero growth in the second quarter. Germany is 28 percent of European GDP. And the value chain for companies in other countries often runs through Germany. Suppliers in Italy or France, for example, sell chemicals, coatings or parts to a Germany company that assembles the final factory machine or car.

GLOBALLY SPEAKING: A renewed slump, or long-term stagnation in Europe is a risk for the global economy as a whole. That’s one reason why International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde keeps urging more stimulus for the region. The European Union, of which Germany is the biggest economy, is the world’s largest economy and trading bloc. It’s a key export market for many firms in the U.S., and a source of investment capital, big-ticket goods and technology for China. In particular, U.S. auto firms such as Ford Motor Co. and General Motors, through its Opel subsidiary, have struggled through a long slump in consumer demand for cars in Europe.

STIMULUS NEEDED: Things in Europe are so worrisome that the European Central Bank is launching more stimulus measures. It cut its interest rate to near zero and is preparing to purchase bundles of bank loans to encourage more lending. Yet even bank President Mario Draghi has warned that the stimulus will not be effective unless several eurozone governments act to make their economies more business-friendly fast payday loan no faxing. France and Italy are often mentioned as countries that could make labor rules more flexible to encourage hiring and investment. But progress is slow.

THE PUTIN EFFECT: Germany makes what economists call investment goods — big-ticket items like printing presses, heavy trucks, or industrial lasers that companies use to make other goods. Uncertainty makes businesses and consumers hesitate, because they can always put off such purchases until things look a little clearer. That’s the effect of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine, which has resulted in the EU and the U.S. imposing economic sanctions on Moscow. Business in the Middle East has also been dented by military conflict in Syria and Iraq.

IN THE BLACK: Some say Germany can help right its economy by spending more. It has good public finances, after all. But Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government has focused on balancing the budget, even as her governing partners, the Social Democrats, have called for more investment spending to fix roads and bridges. Germany can borrow money for essentially zero interest on bond markets; even its longer 10-year bonds yield an astonishingly low 0.91 percent annually, compared with 2.31 percent for U.S. 10-year Treasuries.

But Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble has made it clear the government’s in no mood to increase borrowing.

DON’T PANIC: Andreas Rees, chief Germany economist at Unicredit, says he’s “not in the doomsday camp” predicting a recession. He points out that the German economy has several “airbags” to cushion the bumps and help growth resume. Those include low unemployment of only 4.9 percent, which supports consumer demand from Germany’s large domestic market. A weaker euro — which has dropped to $1.26 from $1.39 in May — should help exporters in coming months. And growth in the U.S. economy should provide more demand for German exports.

In particular, Rees points to a calendar effect that made the latest figures industrial production and exports look particularly bad. Summer vacations were bunched up in August, shutting auto plants at the same time.

LOOKING FORWARD: Rees says the next reading of the Ifo institute’s business confidence survey — a closely watched indicator of where the economy may be going in the months ahead — will be a key indicator of how things are developing. It’s out Oct. 27.

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October 5, 2014

Man rushed to hospital being shot twice near Weston Rd. and St. Clair Ave. W.

Filed under: business, loans — Tags: , , , — Snowman @ 4:56 pm

A shooting near Weston Rd. and Rogers Rd., has left one man with life-threatening injuries.

Toronto Paramedics said they received a call at 5:48 a.m. about a possible shooting.

A man in his 40s was rushed to hospital with several gunshot wounds, including one to his torso that paramedics called “very serious.”

Toronto Police are investigating.

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